High Serum Osteopontin Levels Are Associated with Low Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women

High Serum Osteopontin Levels Are Associated with Low Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women
Eun-Hee Cho, Keun-Hyok Cho, Hyang Ah Lee, and Sang-Wook Kim

Abstract

Osteopontin (OPN) is an acidic, noncollagenous matrix protein produced by the bone and
kidneys. It is reportedly involved in bone resorption and formation. We examined the
association between serum OPN levels and bone mineral density in postmenopausal
women. Premenopausal women (n = 32) and postmenopausal women (n = 409)
participated in the study. We measured serum osteopontin levels and their relationships
with bone mineral density and previous total fragility fractures. The postmenopausal
women had higher mean serum OPN levels compared to the premenopausal women
(43.6 ± 25.9 vs 26.3 ± 18.6 ng/mL; P < 0.001). In the postmenopausal women, high
serum OPN levels were negatively correlated with mean lumbar bone mineral density
(BMD) (r = -0.113, P = 0.023). In a stepwise multiple linear regression model, serum OPN
levels were associated with BMD of the spine, femoral neck, and total hip after adjustment
for age, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity in postmenopausal women.
However, serum OPN levels did not differ between postmenopausal women with and
without fractures. Postmenopausal women exhibit higher serum OPN levels than
premenopausal women and higher serum OPN levels were associated with low BMD in
postmenopausal women.